Difference between Been and Being with Examples

Welcome to this learning platform once again. Thank you for always reading and sharing our posts. I want to show you in this post the Difference between Been and Being with Examples.

Many people cannot differentiate between these two non-modal auxiliary verbs and this bothers them a lot. Surprisingly, many of those who study English also grapple with this problem! This is why this post is timely. Follow me as we look at been and being together.

Difference between Been and Being with Examples

We cannot address the difference between Been and Being with examples without first looking at these two non-modal auxiliaries severally. They both belong to the Part of Speech known as verb. (See the post what is a verb?‘).

There are different types of verbs and I have dedicated a post to discuss these various types. We have the main and auxiliary verbs, we have the regular and irregular verbs, and so many other types.

Been and Being

Been and Being are part of the 8 forms of the BE verb. The 8 forms of the BE verb include the following:

  1. Be
  2. Am
  3. Is
  4. Are
  5. Was
  6. Were
  7. Been
  8. Being

The BE verb, in turn, is one of the three non-modal auxiliary verbs. The other two are Do and Have.

Been

We use this verb to represent any action in the perfective form. Perfective is one of the two forms of aspect in English. (See the post Aspects in English). It represents an action that has taken place or that is completed already. You make use of ‘been’ anytime you have to refer to such an action.

You should also take note that the verb that follows ‘been’ must be in the past participle or the perfective form. In addition, the verb ‘has’ or ‘have’ usually comes before ‘been’ in a sentence. This is simply a matter of Concord or Subject-Verb Agreement. If the subject of the sentence is singular, you make use of ‘has’ and if make use of ‘have’. However, ‘have’ can come after a singular subject. How? See the post Difference between has and have.

Being

In English, we use the verb ‘being’ to represent any action in the progressive or continuous form. Progressive form is one of the two forms of aspect in English. (See the post Aspects in English). It represents an action that is currently taking place or that is still in the process of being completed.

You make use of ‘being’ anytime you have to refer to such an action. You should also take note that the verb that follows ‘being’ must be in the past participle or the perfective form. In addition, it is any of the Be verbs that can come before ‘being’ unlike ‘been’ that accommodates the verb ‘has’ or ‘have’ before it.




Difference between Been and Being

From the foregoing, you must have been able to point out the major difference between ‘been’ and ‘being’. But let us highlight the differences between been and being…

  • We use ‘been’ to describe actions that have been completed.
  • The non-modal verb that precedes ‘been’ is either ‘has’ or ‘have’ alongside their past tense form, ‘had’.
  • We use ‘being’ to describe actions that are ongoing and are yet to be completed.
  • The non-modal verbs that precede ‘being’ are the ‘be’ verb forms.
  • ‘Been’ can stand as a lexical verb but ‘being’ cannot.

The examples given below exemplify all these differences.

Note that in the formation of a passive sentence, we use ‘been’ and ‘being’. In passive sentences, there is usually agent deletion. (See Voice in English).

Difference between Been and Being with Examples

  • He has been arrested.
  • The criminals have been arraigned in court.
  • She was being diplomatic with her answers.
  • They are being conveyed in a public transport.
  • Signals have been received from Mars.
  • The goods had been delivered before he travelled.
  • The result is being processed at the lab.
  • We were being pressurised to dump the party.
  • I have been certified okay.
  • Where have you been?
  • You have been nice to me.
  • She has been there before.
  • It has always been.
  • The kids have always been like that.
  • The weather has been commodious.

Final Words

Once you understand the difference between been and being, you are good to go. Remember, ‘been’ deals with an already completed action while ‘being’ concerns an action that is still ongoing or continuous. Do kindly share this post with your friends. You can make use of our ‘share’ buttons. See you around.

One comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *